Wednesday, November 6, 2013

Obstruction call ruin your game?

Just last week, the Boston Red Sox lost Game 3 of the World Series when the winning run was scored on an obstruction call.   Not a baseball fan?  It's just like the dictionary definition of obstruction -- something that blocks something else.  In this case, the fielder blocked the runner.
I am always on the look out for obstructions when I measure for window treatments. Nothing is worse than getting an obstruction call at the installation.
Crown molding is the most common obstruction. Notice how the crown molding on the adjacent cabinets protrudes into the window molding on both sides of this window.

This prevents a typical outside mount window treatment because the window treatment must be mounted between the crown molding or below the crown molding.  Neither option is ideal.  If the valance is mounted between the crown molding, it is too narrow for the window with the edges of the window molding sticking out on either side.  If the valance is mounted below the molding, it usually must be made too short so that it doesn't block the view, not to mention that the top of the window molding shows.  An obvious solution is to inside mount the window treatment but you still have the issue of finished length versus blocking the view.  I hear time and time again from customers -- "Don't block my view!"

One way to avoid this obstruction call is to design a valance with an arched top.  This allows the valance to be mounted just below the crown molding but visually have enough height and length to be in proportion with the window. Score!

Here is another solution for protruding crown molding.  In this case, an upholstered cornice was made with the top corners angled to accommodate the molding.


Not all obstructions are at the top of the window.  I have to confess when measuring for this job, I was only focused on how much wall space was available next to the window so we could hang the panel off the glass as much as possible. Don't block my view!  At the installation, I got an obstruction call when I looked down and realized the fireplace hearth was in the way.  You're out! The solution required taking the panel back to the workroom and re-hemming the panel so it hangs around the hearth.




Even the best teams lose a game now and then, but if you want a workroom that will go the distance and bring home the trophy, email me at peggy@parkwaywindowworks.com. I'd love to be on your winning team!

No comments:

Post a Comment